Core Strength & Balance Classes for Seniors with Paul Spector

The library is continuing to offer the popular beginning and intermediate classes of Senior Fitness: Core Strength & Balance with Paul Spector, in series of four classes each throughout 2018. All classes will be on Saturdays, 1:30-2:30pm. April & May classes are already partially filled so please register as soon as possible. The second intermediate series is April 7, 14, 21 & 28 and the third beginner is May 5, 12, 19 & 26 and third intermediate: June 2, 9, 16, & 23. Continue reading

Celebrating the Life of Megan Carr-Wilks at Women’s History Event

Assemblymember Didi Barrett will be hosting a celebration of the life of former NYPD officer and Hudson resident Megan Carr-Wilks on Friday, March 23 at 4pm in the library’s Community Room. The event coincides with the release of the fifth volume of Assemblymember Barrett’s “Women’s History in the Hudson Valley: Ten Stories from Columbia and Dutchess Counties” booklet in celebration of Women’s History Month. Megan Carr-Wilks is one of ten remarkable Hudson Valley women honored in this year’s booklet. The event is open to the public.

Megan’s family and friends will share stories about her life and contributions to our community. Megan was an officer with the NYPD during the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, and later moved to Hudson where she worked as a School Resource Officer with the Hudson City School District. She passed away in 2017 from cancer related to her service as a first-responder during 9/11. Continue reading

Nonfiction Book Group to Discuss The New Jim Crow in March

After a very successful first meeting, our new nonfiction book group decided to discuss The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander at their next meeting, March 1, 6-8pm. The New Jim Crow is a thorough and shocking account of how, after the gains of the Civil Rights Movement, the US prison system has functioned as a replacement of Jim Crow and other discriminatory laws and practices that denied African Americans their civil rights. The book is available to borrow in print, ebook, and on CD through the library. To reserve a copy, visit the online catalog, call or stop by the main desk at the library.

Book club selections are chosen based on participants’ suggestions. To register for the book group, email morton@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518.828.1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

This nonfiction book group is focused on history and social and political life in North America. The group will utilize the best in nonfiction books chosen by participants to explore issues that are topical today. All are welcome to join with the hope that participants will impact each other through discussion and community. Mark Orton, a member of the library board, will be the moderator for discussions.

New Sunday Storytelling Program for Children & Families Begins February 11

Pamela Badila of Diata Diata

As part of our expansion for 2018, we are proud to offer “Folktales & Stories for Children & Families” with Pamela Badila, Sundays, 1-2pm beginning February 11.

During our new Sunday hours, Mrs. Badila will present folktales from around the world to children and their families. This special story hour will give families the opportunity to explore stories, told through generations, that formed the traditions and ethics of particular cultures.

Pamela is best known as the matriarch of the Badila clan and co-founder, with her late husband Elombe, of the Diata Diata International Folkloric Theatre. This community theatre company is known for their percussion ensemble, featured annually at the Hudson Winter Walk event and many others in the Northeast. Pamela writes and produces for Diata Diata, and for many years has brought people together through the power of stories. She looks forward to this new adventure!

This program is free and open to the public and take place in the library’s Community Room and children’s area. The library is wheelchair accessible and strollers are welcome.

Frederick Douglass Was Born (02/14/1818): A Family Program

We will be celebrating the 200th anniversary of the chosen birthday of Frederick Douglass (born an enslaved person he did not know the actual date of his birth) with a cultural and literary presentation for ages 7 – 12 and their families on Wednesday, February 14, 3:30-4:30pm. Frederick Douglass Was Born! features Elena Mosley, executive director of Operation Unite NY, who will present readings and fun activities of the life of Frederick Douglass. There will also be a specially decorated cake in honor of Mr. Douglass, who taught himself to read, escaped from slavery, and spent his life speaking on behalf of abolition and women’s rights.

Elena Mosley is an educator, dancer, registered nurse, and a lover of history. As a mom, she exposed her children to their family history as well as the history of African Americans. This event is geared toward children honoring a famous quote by Mr. Douglass: “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” This day coincides with Valentine’s Day and enables participants to show their love for our American history and a man who helped make our union more perfect.

Local History Speaker Series talk in Collaboration with the Leisler Institute

The Jacob Leisler Institute, in cooperation with the library, will present Libelers, Monsters, and Rebels: The Jacob Leisler Institute and Research into New York’s Neglected English Colonial Period on Thursday, February 22 at 6pm at the library. During this local history talk David Voorhees will discuss the Zenger Trial, the Claverack Giant and local Native tribes, the so-called Negro Conspiracy of 1741, and, of course, Jacob Leisler and the 1689-1691 Leisler’s Rebellion. The focus of this event will be on the integration of various European ethnic groups into a broader English colonial melting pot (Huguenots, Germans, Dutch, English, etc), and on the English manorial and political systems which continue to impact this region today.

A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk. For more information email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518.828.1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

A Special High Five! this Week: Children’s Books about Feelings

The library and The Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood are proud to announce a special High Five! Saturday, February 10, 11am – 1pm. Brenda Shufelt will be reading books about feelings to children and their families during our Story Hour.

You may know Brenda as the library’s program director but you may not know that she was an elementary school children’s librarian for 25 years and a citywide mentor for school librarians in New York City. Brenda has developed a collection of books that help children be empathetic and kind to themselves and others. These books are funny, clever, moving and help to put a child at ease with what they face as they navigate socially. Brenda and High Five! facilitator & early childhood expert Kathy Mabb will answer questions on what books are appropriate for different age levels, children’s personality and stages of development. Families will have time to select books from the library collection to bring home and read with their children.

In the High Five! program, families with a child, birth to five, can join a supportive community and learn fun, everyday activities to help build their child’s reading skills! Older siblings are welcome in the library during the program. Participants will receive free books and prizes each week! Lunch is also provided and transportation to the library is available.

The last Saturday ends with a field trip to Spotty Dog Books with each family that has participated in the program receiving a $25 gift certificate to spend at the store.

To sign up for High Five! or request transportation: email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518-828-1792 x101, or stop by the desk at the Hudson Area Library. This program is free and open to all families with children under five, and is wheelchair accessible.

We’re Kicking Off Our New Seven-Day Schedule with a Library Lovers Month Celebration!

The library will offer programs and services seven days a week beginning Sunday, February 11! As of February 11, the library’s hours will be Sunday, 1-4pm; Monday, 9am-5pm; Tuesday & Wednesday, 9am-8pm; Thursday & Friday, 9am-5pm; and Saturday, 10am-3pm. These expanded hours are made possible with the generous support of friends and neighbors in Hudson who voted yes for the library’s community-based funding initiative at the voting booth this past November. For the City of Hudson and the surrounding area to have a library open every day of the week is something of which the citizens in this area can all be proud.

The library will offer special programming to celebrate both Library Lovers Month and the new seven day schedule on Sunday, February 11. In addition, the library will waive up to $5 in overdue fines to any patron, upon request, who visits during the open hours on this special day.

The library’s special celebratory schedule is as follows:

  1. The Friends of the Hudson Area Library, who have been a great support to the library with volunteer help, financial support and programming, will offer free, delectable home baked refreshments.
  2. Pamela Badila will present Folktales & Stories for Children & Families at 1pm, featuring folktales from around the world. This special story hour, which will be held every Sunday at 1pm, will give families the opportunity to explore stories, told through generations, that form the traditions and ethics of particular cultures.
  3. In the library’s History Room, the library has the volunteer services of Tom Buckner, a local photographer. Visitors to the library on February 11 are invited to find themselves or a loved one in the library’s Hudson High School Yearbook collection and have their picture taken alongside the graduation photo. Thanks to Library Clerk Anne Terwilliger and History Room volunteer, Dan Miller, the library now has over 100 years of Hudson High School Yearbooks in their History Room collection (1914 – 2017). This is a free service. The library will send participants the digital file for their use. To make an appointment for a photo session email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org with your name, the yearbook date and name of person in the photo and the library will schedule an appointment.
  4. NorthWinds, a trio of bassoonists, will perform and also discuss the bassoon as instrument at 4pm in the main library. This bassoon ensemble, comprised of John Douglas Ferrigno, Cornelia McGiver, and Nora Post, brings out the jaunty, the moody, the serene, and the serious natures of the instrument in an accessible manner for the audience.

These celebratory events are free and open to the public. The library is wheelchair accessible. For more information email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518.828.1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

Our First Sunday Ends with a Celebratory Bassoon Concert in the Drill Shed!

NorthWinds, a trio of bassoonists, will perform and also discuss the bassoon as instrument on Sunday, February 11, 4pm in the main library (the former drill shed of the Armory building). This bassoon ensemble, comprised of John Douglas Ferrigno, Cornelia McGiver, and Nora Post, brings out the jaunty, the moody, the serene, and the serious natures of the instrument in an accessible manner for the audience. This special concert concludes our first open Sunday, the beginning of our expanded seven-day a week schedule!

NorthWinds was formed in 2017 with the idea that all music is created equal – except in a bassoon ensemble, which is more equal than others. The three bassoonists have found a cheerful and spirited platform for this unsung wind pipe. The ensemble is especially well suited to intimate settings in which the audience and performers have a moment to exchange thoughts as well as to listen to this lesser known instrument. This is exactly what will happen at this free musical event!  

Get Your Photo Taken With Your Former Self or a Relative in a Hudson High Yearbook!

Thanks to Library Clerk Anne Terwilliger and History Room volunteer Dan Miller, we now have over 100 years of Hudson High School Yearbooks in our History Room collection (1914 – 2017)! We discovered our young people are very interested in getting their photos taken with a parent’s yearbook photo (Larry Walker, Jr., pictured here, posing with the photo of Larry Walker, Sr. began this craze).

In celebration of our new seven-day schedule, on Sunday, February 11 from 1-4pm, we have the volunteer services of Tom Buckner, a local photographer, who will take your picture with your graduation photo or the graduation photo of a relative from the near or distant past. This is a free service and we will send you the digital file for your use. To make an appointment for a photo session email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org with your name, the yearbook date and name of person in the photo and we will give you an appointment.